WRENs

Order Passeriformes   Family Troglodytidae

Wrens are mainly small and inconspicuous, except for their loud and often complex songs. These birds have short wings and they cannot see at night. Several species often hold their tails upright and sleep on the ground. Wrens are insectivorous, eating insects and spiders but they will also eat fish, small rodents and lizards. The dominating colors of their plumage are drab, composed of gray, brown, black and white, and most species show some barring, especially to tail and/or wings. There is no sexual dimorphism in the plumage of wrens, and little difference between young birds and adults.

Wrens are principally a New World Family, distributed from Alaska and Canada to southern Argentina. A single species, the Winter Wren, is found not only in North America but also in Eastern Asia, Europe and marginally into North Africa. They species in a wide range of habitats, ranging from dry, sparsely wooded country to rainforest. The vast majority are found at low levels.


Genus Campylorhynchus

Wren, Bicolored  Campylorhynchus griseus  Found: Colombia, Venezuela, Guyana, northern Brazil
The Bicolored Wren has brown upperparts; black cap, nape, eye-line; off-white underparts.
Image by: 1) Tom Friedel - Venezuela  2, 3) Barloventomagico - Venezuela


Wren, Bouchard's   Campylorhynchus jocosus   Found: Mexico
The Bouchard's Wren has rufous upperparts with white spots; white underparts with dark spots; brown crown; white throat; black eye-line; whitish-and-black streaked nape; white supercilium; reddish eyes.
Image by: 1) Dominic Sherony  2) Jorge Montejo  3) Amy McAndrews


Wren, Cactus Campylorhynchus brunneicapillus   Found: arid regions - southwest United States, Mexico
The Cactus Wren has brown upperparts interspersed with white, white eye-stripe. It is the largest North American wren.
Image by: 1, 2) Dick Daniels - Arizona  3) Alan D. Wilson - Edinburg, Texas   4) Elaine R. Wilson  - Borrego Springs, California  5, 6) Alan Vernon   7, 8) New Jersy Birds - Arizona
1) Juvenile


Wren, Fasciated  Campylorhynchus fasciatus  Found: Ecuador, Peru
The Fasciated Wren has mainly gray upperparts with dark barring; whitish underparts with lighter barring.
Image by: 1) Francesco Veronesi - south Ecuador  2) Amy McAndrews - Peru


Wren, Giant   Campylorhynchus chiapensis   Found: Mexico (Chiapas)
The Giant Wren has rufous upperparts; black crown, nape, eye-line; white supercilium, underparts.
Image by: 1) Amy McAndrews  2) Francesco Veronesi  3) Jerry Oldenettel


Wren, Spotted   Campylorhynchus gularis   Found: Mexico
The Spotted Wren has brown upperparts, barred tail; white supercilium; off-white underparts with spotted breast-band and flanks.
Image by: 1, 2, 3) Emily Hoyer



Genus Catherpes - 1 species

Wren, Canyon Catherpes mexicanus   Found: dry, rocky environments - west United States, Mexico
The Canyon Wren has brown body, rufous tail, white throat, long thin bill. Usually found in arid rocky area.
Similar to: Rock Wren. Rock Wren has light gray stripe starting above the eye and proceeding towards back of head, Canyon wren does not have such a stripe.
Image by:  1) J N Stuart - New Mexico  2) Julio Mulero - California  3) Jerry Oldenettel - New Mexico  4) Jon David Nelson




Genus Cistothorus

Wren, Marsh  Cistothorus palustris  Found: Marshes in tall vegetation - North America
The Marsh Wren has brown upperparts with black and white stripes on part of back, light brown underparts, off white throat, dark brown cap, white supercilium.
Similar to: Sedge Wren.  Marsh Wren has stripes in middle of back, Sedge Wren has faint stripes over entire back.
Image by: 1) Winnu - British Columbia  2)  tgreyfox - Vancouver, Canada    3) Alan Wilson - California 4) juvethski - Vancouver 5) Steve Arena - Massachusetts



Wren, Sedge   Cistothorus platensis  Found: short grass and marshes - east North America, South America
The Sedge Wren has dark-brown streaked upperparts, light brown underparts, off white throat, dark brown cap, white supercilium.
Similar to: Marsh Wren.  Marsh Wren has stripes in middle of back, Sedge Wren has faint stripes over entire back.
Image by: 1) SolidElectronics - Ontario  2, 3, 4, 5) Ken Schneider - Illinois




Genus

Wren, Nightingale Microcerculus philomela  Found: Mexico, Central America, South America
The Nightingale Wren is sometimes split into Northern Nighingale Wren (Microcerculus philomela) and Southern Nightingal Wren (Microcerculus marginatus). Northern is in Mexico and Central America. Southern is in Central America (Costa Rico, Panama) and South America.
Image by:



Genus Salpinctes - 1 species

Wren, Rock Salpinctes obsoletus   Found: west North America, Central America
The Rock Wren has gray-brown upperparts with small black and white spots, pale gray underparts with ligh brown rump, light gray supercilium. They breed in dry rocky areas.
Similar to: Canyon Wren. Rock Wren has light gray stripe starting above the eye and proceeding towards back of head, Canyon wren does not have such a stripe.
Image by: 1) Jeff Whitlock - Texas  2) Marcel Holyoak - California  3)  Alan D. Wilson - New Mexico  4) Linda Tanner   




Genus Thryothorus - 1 species

Wren, Carolina Thryothorus ludovicianus   Found: North America (eastern)
The Carolina Wren has rufous upperparts, orange buff underparts, barring on flanks usually visible, white supercilium, white throat and cheeks,
Similar to: Berwick's Wren.  Berwick's Wren is smaller but with a longer tail, grayer-brown above and whiter below than Carolina Wren.
Image by: 1) Don Poncamo - Texas  2, 4, 5, 6) Dick Daniels - South Carolina; Ash, NC  3) New Jersy Birds  7) Amy McAndrews - Mexico
1, 2, 3) Northern  4) Mexican




Genus Thryomanes - 1 species

Wren, Berwick's  Thryomanes bewickii  Found: North America
The Berwick's Wren has gray-brown upperparts, white underparts, barring on flanks usually visible, white supercilium, white throat,
Similar to: Carolina Wren.  Berwick's Wren is smaller but with a longer tail, grayer-brown above and whiter below than Carolina Wren.
Image by: 1) Charlie Westerinen along the Carson River in Nevada  2) Minette Layne - Washington   3) Ingrid Taylor - Oregon



Genus Troglodytes

Wren, Eurasian  Troglodytes troglodytes  Found: Europe, Asia
The Eurasian Wren has rufous upperparts with faint white barring, light brownish-gray underparts, short tail perhaps a supercilium depending on the subspecies. It likes to hang out in cavities,
Related to: Winter Wren.  Winter Wren and Eurasian Wren were once considered one species. The Eurasian Wren is the only member of the wren family Troglodytidae in Europe, Asia
Image by: 1) Robert Lorch  2) Sylvain Haye - France  3) Cristiano Crolle - Palude Brabbia, Italy


Wren, House Troglodytes aedon   Found: The Americas
The House Wren has brown upperparts; faint eye-ring; barring to the wings, tail, and flanks; long thin bill; black upper mandible, lighter lower mandible. Depending on the subspecies it has light brown, gray, or white underparts; pink or gray legs. Tail is often held cocked.
Image by: 1) Calibas - Colorado  2) New Jersy Birds - New Jersey  3) Per Verdonk - Michigan   4) S. King - New Mexico  5) Ted Llovet - California   6) Ken Schneider - Illinois  7) Dick Daniels - Peru   8) Dick - near Penonome, Panama


Southern House Wren  Troglodytes aedon musculus  Found: South America
Image by: 1, 2, 3, 4) Dario Sanches - Brazil


Wren, Pacific Troglodytes pacificus Found: west North America
The Pacific Wren has rufous plumage barred with darker brown, light supercilium. It has a chubby appearance.
Similar to: Winter Wren. Winter Wren and Pacific Wren were once considered one species. Their ranges usually do not overlap.
Image by: 1) Julio Mulero - California  2)  Brian & Jessi - Washington


Wren, Winter  Troglodytes hiemalis  Found: east North America
The Pacific Wren has brown upperparts, gray-brown underparts with some barring, light supercilium. It has a chubby appearance.
Similar to: Eurasian Wren.  Winter Wren and Eurasian Wren were once considered one species. The Eurasian Wren is the only member of the wren family Troglodytidae in Europe, Asia
Similar to: Pacific Wren. Winter Wren and Pacific Wren were once considered one species. Their ranges usually do not overlap.
Image by: 1, 2) Kelly Azar  - Pennsylvania  3) Ed Gaillard - New York
3) after a bath






GNATCATCHERs

Order Passeriformes   Family Polioptilidae



The gnatcatchers occur in North and South America . Most species of this mainly tropical and subtropical group are resident, but the Blue-gray Gnatcatcher of the USA and southern Canada migrates south in winter. They are close relatives of the wrens.

These dainty birds are intermediate between "Old World warblers" and wrens in their structure and habits, moving restlessly through the foliage seeking insects. The gnatcatchers are mainly soft bluish gray in color, and have the typical insectivore's long sharp bill. Many species have distinctive black head patterns (esp. males) and long, regularly cocked, black-and-white tails.


Genus Polioptila

Gnatcatcher, Black-capped  Polioptila nigriceps   Found: North America (Arizona), Mexico
The Black-capped Gnatcatcher has blue-gray upperparts, white underparts, long thin bill. The male has a black cap.
Similar to: Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher.
Image by: 1) Jerry Oldenettel - Mexico2) Dominic Sherony - Arizona 
1) Female 2) Male


Gnatcatcher, Black-tailed Polioptila melanura   Found: North America
The Black-tailed Gnatcatcher has blue-gray upperparts, white underparts, white eye-ring, It has a long black tail with white edges. The breeding male has a black cap, others do not.
Similar to: Blue-Gray Gnatcatcher. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher tail mostly white when viewed from below, Black-tailed Gnatcatcher tail predominantly black underneath.
Similar to: California Gnatcatcher. They were once considered the same species. Distinguished by range: Black-tailed Gnatcatcher - Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts; California Gnatcatcher - coastal sage growth.
Image by:  1) Amy McAndrews - Mexico   J N Stuart - Nevada 3, 5) Charlie Westerinen - Anza Borrego Park in California  4) Dick - Arizona
2) Nonbreeding male 3, 4, 5) Breeding male


Gnatcatcher, Blue-gray Polioptila caerulea   Found: North America and Central America
The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher has blue-gray upperparts, white underparts, long thin bill, white eye-ring. It has a black tail with white edges. The male has a black forehead. The female is less blue than the male.
Similar to: Black-tailed Gnatcatcher. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher tail mostly white when viewed from below, Black-tailed Gnatcatcher tail predominantly black underneath.
Similar to: Bushtit. Gnatcatcher has longer bill than Bushtit. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher's back is same color as head, Bushtit's head is different color.
Image by: 1) mctheriot - Moraine Hills Park, Illinois  2) Elaine R. Wilson - Borrego Springs, California    3, 5) Dick Daniels - North Carolina  4) Dick - Arizona


Gnatcatcher, California  Polioptila californica   Found: southwest California to Baja
The California Gnatcatcher has dark gray upperparts, lighter underparts, white eye-ring, long thin black tail with white edges. The male has a black crown; female has blue-gray crown.
Similar to: Black-tailed Gnatcatcher. They were once considered the same species. Distinguished by range: Black-tailed Gnatcatcher - Sonoran and Chihuahuan Deserts; California Gnatcatcher - coastal sage growth.
Image by:  1) Julio Mulero - California  2) Billtacular


Gnatcatcher, Cuban Polioptila lembeyei  Found: Cuba
The Cuban Gnatcatcher has blue-gray upperparts, white underparts, white eye-ring, black cresent on side of head.
Image by: Dominic Sherony


Gnatcatcher, Masked  Polioptila dumicola  Found: South America
The Masked Gnatcatcher has blue-gray upperparts, light underparts, black mask, black top of tail, white bottom of tail.
Image by: 1, 2, 3, 4) Cláudio Timm in Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil
1, 2, 3) Male  4) Female




There is disagreement over where to place the Donacobius. Some have suggested that they are relsted to wrens.
Genus Donacobius - 1 species

Donacobius, Black-capped  Donacobius atricapilla  Found: Central and South America
Image by:  1) Claudio Timm - the Amazon, Brazil  2) Dario Sanches  3) Dick Daniels - near Penonome, Panama





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